Otology is a branch of medicine which studies the normal and pathological anatomy and physiology of the ear (including hearing and vestibular sensory systems, and related structures and functions) as well as their diseases, diagnoses, and treatments.

Eardrum Perforation Repair

A hole in the eardrum can be caused by numerous factors such as infection, trauma, and/or prior surgeries. When present, these holes can cause decreased hearing, frequent ear infections and the inability to get water in the ear. Surgical repair involves creating a new ear drum, which is typically made by using the body’s own tissue to reconstruct it. Repair can lead to a normal functioning ear with improved hearing, resolution of infections, and the ability to participate in water activities.

A hole in the eardrum can be caused by numerous factors such as infection, trauma, and/or prior surgeries. When present, these holes can cause decreased hearing, frequent ear infections and the inability to get water in the ear. Surgical repair involves creating a new ear drum, which is typically made by using the body’s own tissue to reconstruct it. Repair can lead to a normal functioning ear with improved hearing, resolution of infections, and the ability to participate in water activities.

Eardrum perforation. After surgical repair, the patient had complete resolution of their hearing loss and was able to participate in water activities without any issues.

Ear Tumor Removal

Growths within the ear can erode surrounding structures and lead to recurrent infections and hearing loss. The most common type of growth is called a cholesteatoma and is often referred to as a skin cyst of the inner ear. These growths require surgery for definitive removal and to prevent further damage to the ear. Often, hearing can also be improved with this surgery as well.

Ear with chronic drainage and hearing loss due to a cholesteatoma.

Widening of the Ear Canal

Sometimes the ear canal can become narrowed due to scarring or overgrowth of the underlying tissue. This can lead to hearing loss, recurrent infections and difficulty for the ear to self-clean any wax. Surgery can widen the ear canal and restore its normal function.

The ear canal is completely obstructed by a bony lesion called an osteoma. The osteoma caused recurrent wax build up, along with hearing loss. 

The eardrum is clearly visualized after surgical removal of the osteoma.